Wine company – Perbacco Cellars http://perbaccocellars.com/ Mon, 09 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://perbaccocellars.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/cropped-icon-32x32.png Wine company – Perbacco Cellars http://perbaccocellars.com/ 32 32 Wander + Ivy, Women- and Disability-Owned Winery, to Feature at 2022 PGA Championship https://perbaccocellars.com/wander-ivy-women-and-disability-owned-winery-to-feature-at-2022-pga-championship/ Mon, 09 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/wander-ivy-women-and-disability-owned-winery-to-feature-at-2022-pga-championship/ denver and Wander + Ivy, based in Napa, is a certified women-owned and disabled-owned business that provides premium wine in premium, patented single-serve packaging. All Wander + Ivy wines are made from certified organic, hand-picked grapes by Wander + Ivy’s renowned winemaker and his team of certified Level II sommeliers, including its founder and CEO, […]]]>

denver and Wander + Ivy, based in Napa, is a certified women-owned and disabled-owned business that provides premium wine in premium, patented single-serve packaging. All Wander + Ivy wines are made from certified organic, hand-picked grapes by Wander + Ivy’s renowned winemaker and his team of certified Level II sommeliers, including its founder and CEO, Dana Spaulding.

We are thrilled to feature various brands like Wander + Ivy at the PGA Championship, the oldest and most prestigious championship in all of senior golf.,” mentioned Bryan KarnChampionship Director of the 2022 PGA Championship.”With a shared commitment to excellence making this partnership a natural fit, we’re sure PGA fans and players will enjoy Wander + Ivy’s high quality and elevated wines..”

Two of Wander + Ivy’s five varietals – Chardonnay and Rosé – will be available in elegant 6.3-ounce glass bottles at Club 1916, the tournament’s largest premium concession area, as well as Media Suites and Viewing Suites. throughout the course.

As Wander + Ivy continues to fulfill its mission to enhance the single-serve wine experience, we are thrilled to partner with the PGA Championship and bring our high-quality products to guests and players. We are proud to renew our partnership with the PGA as we share many of the same values ​​- from excellence to commitment to diversity and inclusion“said Spaulding.

Wander + Ivy is proud to offer a unique wine experience that combines the exquisite taste and terroir of organically grown grapes from sustainable growers with convenient, premium packaging and a deep commitment to helping charities feed those in need. Each year, Wander + Ivy donates 1% of total sales to non-profit organizations providing healthy food to those in need.

For more information on Wander + Ivy, visit www.wanderandivy.com and follow the brand on @WanderandIvy on social networks.

MEDIA CONTACT: Erin JaffeNike Communications, [email protected](646) 654-3404

About Wander + Ivy
denver and Wander + Ivy, based in Napa, is a certified women-owned and disabled-owned business that provides quality wine in premium single-serve packages. All Wander + Ivy wines are produced by award-winning family wineries around the world. Each year, Wander + Ivy donates 1% of total wine sales to non-profit organizations providing healthy food to those in need. All varietals are made with certified organic grapes and are available for purchase at select retail stores in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Maine, Montana, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Oregon, Texas and Washington including Kroger, Albertsons, Safeway, Whole Foods, Natural Grocers, HEB and Walmart (https://wanderandivy.com/pages/store-locator), as well as online at https://wanderandivy.com/collections/all-wines.

SOURCE Stroll + Ivy

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Liverpool’s award-winning ‘low-calorie’ wine company is now in America https://perbaccocellars.com/liverpools-award-winning-low-calorie-wine-company-is-now-in-america/ Sun, 08 May 2022 19:47:21 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/liverpools-award-winning-low-calorie-wine-company-is-now-in-america/ A Liverpool wine company specializing in low-calorie vegan Prosecco and Sparkling Rosé has launched in America. ThinK Wines was first established by Liverpool entrepreneur Katherine Jones in 2019. Since then the business has won six awards, the most recent being silver at the People’s Choice Wine Awards. The company has now gone global, with Americans […]]]>

A Liverpool wine company specializing in low-calorie vegan Prosecco and Sparkling Rosé has launched in America.

ThinK Wines was first established by Liverpool entrepreneur Katherine Jones in 2019. Since then the business has won six awards, the most recent being silver at the People’s Choice Wine Awards.

The company has now gone global, with Americans able to get their hands on ThinK Wines. Speaking to ECHO days before flying to the US, Katherine said: “I couldn’t have imagined this when we first launched. I have big visions and have faith in the product, so I’ve always seen it expand around the world, but I didn’t think it would happen in this time frame.

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“I thought ThinK Wines would need at least five years to conquer the UK before we could even go overseas. Two months ago we launched in New York, New Jersey, California and Florida. I now go to Los Angeles to meet the bars that stock ThinK and meet new potential customers.



Wine Award.” content=”https://i2-prod.liverpoolecho.co.uk/incoming/article23860939.ece/ALTERNATES/s615b/0_PBA_LEC_040522KATHERINEJPG.jpg”/>
Katherine with the Silver People’s Choice Wine Award.

“I’m also going to New York where I have a few speaking engagements with businesswomen, and I hope to sell the wine to a few New York venues. Then it’s off to Florida. It seems that, especially in California, there is a very strong demand for a product like mine. I can’t miss this opportunity.

“It’s about building a relationship with the people who are going to sell the wine in America. That’s why I’m excited. When I see people there ordering it, it will be a real pinch moment for me.

Katherine originally created ThinK Wines for herself. She explained, “I’ve always struggled with my weight and sugar is a huge demon for me. I have an influencer marketing background so I used to go to launch events and meet influencers and the welcome drink was Prosecco or Champagne. It would be very dry and full of sugar so I would drink it and not particularly enjoy it, plus it would be full of calories.



ThinK Wines Sparkling Rosé.
ThinK Wines Sparkling Rosé.

“I thought, imagine if you could create a drink that was still delicious but had a lot less sugar. I did some research and couldn’t find any, then eventually I found one, but it didn’t taste good. That’s how the idea of ​​ThinK Wines was born, because I thought that if there was only one competitor and I knew it was not from the best quality, then I should go for it.

The fact that ThinK Wines is also vegan and low in calories is a big selling point for the product. Katherine said: “Everyone is asking for vegan products now, and every time I sell to a wholesaler, the first thing they ask me is, ‘is it vegan?’ I’m so thankful that when we created it a few years ago I made it vegan I’m not personally vegan so I could easily have thought it wasn’t necessary but I had anticipated that the world would go this way. I’m trying to cut back on my chicken eating habits!”

Once Katherine conquers America, it will be in the next country. She told ECHO: “I would love to do Australia next. They are very health conscious and I know they love their bubbles too. To be honest, there’s nowhere I wouldn’t like to see ThinK!

You can learn more about ThinK Wines via the website. You can buy Prosecco here and sparkling rosé here.

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Napa Valley Wine Company Duckhorn Buys Paso Robles Vineyard https://perbaccocellars.com/napa-valley-wine-company-duckhorn-buys-paso-robles-vineyard/ Fri, 06 May 2022 15:31:31 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/napa-valley-wine-company-duckhorn-buys-paso-robles-vineyard/ The Duckhorn Portfolio, which operates Duckhorn Vineyards in Napa Valley, Calif., has acquired Bottom Line Ranch in Paso Robles, Calif., adding 265 acres of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes to its portfolio. Photo courtesy of Duckhorn Portfolio. duck horn walleta leading wine company based in Napa Valley, has expanded its presence in central California with its latest […]]]>

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The Duckhorn Portfolio, which operates Duckhorn Vineyards in Napa Valley, Calif., has acquired Bottom Line Ranch in Paso Robles, Calif., adding 265 acres of Cabernet Sauvignon grapes to its portfolio.

duck horn walleta leading wine company based in Napa Valley, has expanded its presence in central California with its latest acquisition.

Duckhorn, headquartered in St. Helena, operates 10 wineries and seven tasting rooms.

The company recently purchased Bottom Line Rancha 289-acre property in the San Miguel District of America’s Paso Robles Wine Country, according to a company press release.

The deal includes 265 acres of drought-tolerant Cabernet Sauvignon grapes grown by Bottom Line Ranch, according to the release.

“This acquisition follows our long-term strategy of supporting our wineries with strong properties,” Duckhorn Portfolio CEO and President Alex Ryan said in the release. “Adding Bottom Line Ranch’s 265 acres of cabernet sauvignon to our estate program will provide us with exceptional grapes for both Lure and Postmarkwhile delivering on our commitment to the Central Coast.

PJ Alviso, vice president of Duckhorn Central Coast viticulture, noted the size, location, age and quality of the Cabernet Sauvignon-focused vineyard.

“Bottom Line Ranch is a rare find,” Alviso said in the release. “In terms of row orientation, rootstocks and clonal selection, it has excellent fundamentals.”

Duckhorn Portfolio already has interests in central California through Calera Cellarwhich manages 82 acres of vineyards on Mount Harlan in San Benito County, according to the release.

Duckhorn’s viticulture team and Calera Winery‘s vineyard manager will take over the farming of Bottom Line Ranch, the company said.

The company plans to rename the vineyard in the coming months, according to the statement.

Financial information about the deal has not been made public, according to the statement.

This story was originally published May 6, 2022 8:31 a.m.

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THE PINTCAST: John Martini of Anthony Road Wine Company on growing grapes, making wine and working as a family (podcast) https://perbaccocellars.com/the-pintcast-john-martini-of-anthony-road-wine-company-on-growing-grapes-making-wine-and-working-as-a-family-podcast/ Tue, 03 May 2022 15:14:18 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/the-pintcast-john-martini-of-anthony-road-wine-company-on-growing-grapes-making-wine-and-working-as-a-family-podcast/ I sat with John at Anthony Road, with its breathtaking view of Seneca Lake. In 1973, a friend told John and Anne Martini that they should move to the Finger Lakes and grow grapes. When changes in the industry made it more difficult to sell their crop, they opened Anthony Road in 1990. They gathered […]]]>

I sat with John at Anthony Road, with its breathtaking view of Seneca Lake.

In 1973, a friend told John and Anne Martini that they should move to the Finger Lakes and grow grapes. When changes in the industry made it more difficult to sell their crop, they opened Anthony Road in 1990. They gathered material and bottled their first vintage from the 1989 crop. The winery became a business of family, with his son Peter taking over the vineyard and other family members helping Anthony Road become one of the most renowned wineries in the Finger Lakes.

We talked about the years-long effort, chronicled in Evan Dawson’s book “Summer in a Glass,” to save winemaker Johannes Reinhardt from being deported to Germany and how current winemaker Peter Becraft entered a day, struck up a conversation with Johannes, then took over winemaking duties when Reinhardt left to start his own winery across the road.

We discussed the romance of growing grapes and making wine versus the grueling, cold, soggy reality. John told me that when someone expresses an interest in getting into the wine business, he invites that person to join the crew during the crushing, when the grapes are pressed down and their skins crushed, letting the juice. It’s hard work and John says if anyone still wants to be involved after a day with the Crush team, they know they could have a goalie.

You can join John and Ann on a Rhine cruise in November.

Like many people in the industry, John likes to talk about what he does and he’s seen it all, from the beginnings of the modern Finger Lakes wine industry in the 1970s to today. I was happy to listen, and afterwards, to taste. Anthony Road has moved to the more formal tasting room model that many wineries have adopted since the COVID-19 pandemic. You will be seated at a table, with your choice of themed flights. I have a weakness for the typical dry whites of our region. The 2020 dry Riesling is unctuous, with the mineral component that I really like and a very subtle fruitiness. Another favorite was Vignoles, a hybrid variety that is usually sweeter, but these grapes were picked early, so the wine retains a strong fruity note, but contains only 1.9% residual sugar.

Appointments are requested for tastings. With members of the Martini family carrying on the tradition of John and Ann, the next 30 years look bright. I enjoyed the conversation and I hope you will too.

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Cree Wine Company brings a world of wine to Hampton https://perbaccocellars.com/cree-wine-company-brings-a-world-of-wine-to-hampton/ Mon, 02 May 2022 13:43:36 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/cree-wine-company-brings-a-world-of-wine-to-hampton/ In his travels to France, Italy, California and beyond, Chris Cree never forgot his Jersey roots. After years of connecting with wineries, learning the industry, starting his own business and becoming a certified Master of Wine, Cree opened his first restaurant/wine bar this year. Inside the historic Perryville Inn in Hampton, Cree Wine Company offers […]]]>

In his travels to France, Italy, California and beyond, Chris Cree never forgot his Jersey roots.

After years of connecting with wineries, learning the industry, starting his own business and becoming a certified Master of Wine, Cree opened his first restaurant/wine bar this year. Inside the historic Perryville Inn in Hampton, Cree Wine Company offers all kinds of wines from around the world, with prices ranging from $10 to $1,000 a bottle. The wines come mainly from small family estates, inspired by the visits of the Crees to the regions of the world.

Every weekend, Cree Wine Company offers wine education classes, with spirits classes on weeknights. In April, the company organized a Tour de France, introducing guests to a new region and its wines every Sunday.

As New Jersey’s only Master of Wine, Cree knew that one day his experience in the wine industry would lead him to where he is today.

“There’s always been an idea of ​​trying to create a place where food and wine come together,” he says, “where wine can be less intimidating and people can enjoy it in a comfortable place.”

You have been involved in food and wine for over 40 years. What drew you to the industry?
Chris Cris: I have been interested in food since I was a child. I cooked with my mother and we watched Julia Child on TV. When I entered my teenage years, wine became a big part of it. I got a job at a liquor store and thought it would just be a way to make some money before I went to college, but the doors kept opening in the wine business . I worked there for probably five years and after that I traveled a lot around the world. I have made connections with wineries all over the world, from California to Europe.

What does it take to become a Master of Wine?
There was no high level business degree for the wine trade, so the institute was set up in London to test and certify people in the business. The exam takes place over four days and sections include grape growing, wine business, wine making and blind taste testing, where you have to identify the country, region, production method etc. . They began to organize the courses in the United States. in 1989, so I went in 1993 and passed in 1996.

Do you have a favorite wine region?
There are so many ! I must say that Burgundy is a place that I really appreciate. The wines are fantastic and this is probably the most important place to visit, taste wine and find out what’s going on. I love going to Italy, especially Piedmont and Tuscany. There are so many beautiful regions; it’s hard to choose a favorite.

Have you always wanted to open your own wine bar?
Yeah, it was kind of always in the back of my head. It’s inspired by some of the places I’ve been and my experiences visiting and tasting wine. An example is Robert Sinskey in California, who has a fantastic food and wine experience. It’s a culmination of things I’ve learned and seen and wanted to bring back to New Jersey for people to experience.

Cree Wine Company is located in what was the Perryville Inn. What attracted you to this historic place?
I’ve always had it in the back of my mind. This is an 1813 brick farmhouse and inn. I started going to the Perryville Inn many years ago when it was owned by the Pfenninger family. I had a wine store in Clinton, and I hosted dinner parties and wine tastings there. It was full of good memories. It closed in 2012 and reopened as a barbecue venue. When the opportunity presented itself last year, I knew it was the right time to do it.

What does the renovated space look like?
It’s an old building, so it needed a lot of work. I had a fantastic designer, Suzanne Perez, and she pushed me to revamp the place a bit to make it more modern. Everything is very comfortable and welcoming. There’s a bar, tasting lounge, and wine studio, which doubles as a private event space. We also give our courses and our oenological dinners there. We have a small patio which will be open when it gets warmer.

What kind of food does the kitchen offer?
I met chef AJ Sankofa and we immediately clicked. He is super talented. We call the dishes to share or to associate. We have everything from charcuterie boards, Brussels sprouts, salads, seafood stew, steak, really everything. We have a fantastic dish, the Sicilian Fried Chicken, which seems to be everyone’s favourite. We have a wide range of things that change with the season and what we feature. Many dishes are based on regions of the world and are accompanied by wines from there.

What’s it like to open your own place?
Fantastic. In addition to restoring and bringing back this very old and beautiful building, there is a lot going on in Hunterdon County. Farm to table, cheese makers, winemakers, cider houses; it really is a dynamic place. I’m just happy to go to work and have a great team that provides a great environment. I have fun!

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South African wine company hits Chinese consumers’ good taste buds https://perbaccocellars.com/south-african-wine-company-hits-chinese-consumers-good-taste-buds/ Fri, 01 Apr 2022 02:13:21 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/south-african-wine-company-hits-chinese-consumers-good-taste-buds/ AM Vineyards co-owners Andrew Robinson (right) and Matthew Karan saw an opportunity opening up in the Chinese market. (Photo: AM Vineyards) When countries around the world were locked down by Covid-19 and alcohol sales were restricted in South Africa, AM Vineyards co-owners Andrew Robinson and Matthew Karan set their sights on the Chinese market for […]]]>

AM Vineyards co-owners Andrew Robinson (right) and Matthew Karan saw an opportunity opening up in the Chinese market. (Photo: AM Vineyards)

When countries around the world were locked down by Covid-19 and alcohol sales were restricted in South Africa, AM Vineyards co-owners Andrew Robinson and Matthew Karan set their sights on the Chinese market for wine.

The company produces fine wines, mainly for export.

Robinson and Karan saw opportunities opening up in this market as the Chinese government increased its tariffs on Australian wines to more than 200%, alleging dumping. The increase in tariffs led to a 90% year-on-year drop in Australian wine imports into China. But the high import tariff does not apply to South African wine.

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China has a population of 50 million wine drinkers who consumed around 1.24 billion liters of wine in 2020 – despite being considered a low consumption year due to the pandemic. China imports about 55% of the wine consumed in this country. In 2020, South Africa was the eighth largest wine producing country in the world, accounting for 4% of the wine drunk globally. China is South Africa’s fourth largest destination for wine exports and accounts for 4% of total local wine exports.

“Interest in South African wines is on the rise in China. Although 2020 is a relatively low consumption year – down 15% from 2019, South African exports are back on a growth trajectory in value and volume. Other East Asian markets such as Hong Kong are also growing,” says Robinson.

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Robinson and Karan had both been entrepreneurs in China for many years and chose to put their experience to the test. They decided not to just export their existing wine products to China, but developed their Karan range, which includes two new red wines – The Collection and The Selection – specifically aimed at the Chinese market.

“Given the cultural symbolism associated with the color red in China – happiness, success and good fortune – it’s no surprise that 80% of the wine consumed in China is red,” says Karan.

Red meats, especially fine beef, are popular, so Chinese export wines were created with this in mind. The Karan range is largely focused on high-end restaurants and hotels, particularly in Beijing and Shanghai.

With the harvest currently underway, AM Vineyards will produce more blends in the Karan range to further capitalize on the growing Chinese market.

“Our business model is different from that of a typical winery. We have partnered with winemakers and farms in areas like Franschhoek, Elgin, the Hemel and Aarde Valley and Swartland, where our winemakers manage specific parcels of vines. We harvest and bottle our own wine and use our own cellars. It’s a versatile business model that allows us to get the best grapes, the best product and the best scale,” says Robinson.

“Wine is a growing industry in China, whereas in South Africa we have a history of wine production of over 300 years. Wine from South Africa is not well known in China, while they are more familiar with French, Australian and Chilean wines. This means that there is a lot of work to be done by the South African wine industry in China to present its excellent products.”

Some South African companies do, but only on a small scale.

“Our philosophy is never to put a square block in a round hole. Instead, make sure you understand your customers and what they want. We did a lot of consumer testing in China when we developed our Karan range so that it is perfect for the Chinese palate. . [The consumers] a well-aged, easy-drinking wine with low acidity and low tannin,” says Robinson.

“In China, we are in competition with the biggest global brands”

“Our strategy is not to develop products in South Africa and then send them to China. That’s why we developed the wine in China and then got our winemakers in South Africa to match that. .We have spent a lot of money testing consumers in the Chinese market .It is easy to send a first container of wine to this market but then the challenge is to get repeat orders – which they won’t only if they like your product.”

Asked about a possible impact of the crisis in Ukraine on their wine exports to China, Robinson said they currently have containers on the water en route to China. Chinese customs have already cleared other shipments.

“It’s too early to say what the impact of the Ukraine crisis might be for us at this stage. We don’t have any product for Russia and Europe. We’ll just wait and see,” Robinson said. . He adds that the Covid-19 pandemic has had a huge impact on price increases in transport and logistics.

“It makes it difficult for business owners to manage price increases without ending up going out of business. It makes doing business more difficult, but it also creates opportunities if you can be nimble and understand the numbers game. “says Robinson.

“In China, we compete with the biggest brands in the world, so getting the right product for that environment is important. It’s also about getting sommeliers and restaurant staff to taste our wine and know more about it. We are investing in educating Chinese consumers that South African wines can compete with the best in the world.”

What is the story of the SA wine they are spreading in China?

The Chinese market loves the history of SA wines – its long tradition. At the same time, they want a different and new wine.

“Our story is that South African wine straddles both the old world and new world approach to winemaking. We honor the history and tradition of the South African wine industry, but use also fresh, modern and smart techniques to blend our wines for the Chinese palate. And of course, we make sure we are selling a quality product to our Chinese customers,” says Robinson.


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Nina Dobrev and Julianne Hough started their wine business after waking up hungover https://perbaccocellars.com/nina-dobrev-and-julianne-hough-started-their-wine-business-after-waking-up-hungover/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 22:00:30 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/nina-dobrev-and-julianne-hough-started-their-wine-business-after-waking-up-hungover/ Celebrities Julianne Hough and Nina Dobrev forged a true friendship that led to them becoming business partners by starting a wine business together. the old Dancing with the stars performer and The Vampire Diaries star share a passion for healthy living. To that end, the two have launched a wine brand that has taken off […]]]>

Celebrities Julianne Hough and Nina Dobrev forged a true friendship that led to them becoming business partners by starting a wine business together. the old Dancing with the stars performer and The Vampire Diaries star share a passion for healthy living. To that end, the two have launched a wine brand that has taken off in recent years.

In a December 2021 interview, Dobrev and Hough sat down to discuss their Fresh Wine Vine brand, revealing the exact moment the brainchild was born.

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Find out how French rugby star Gérard Bertrand built a great wine business https://perbaccocellars.com/find-out-how-french-rugby-star-gerard-bertrand-built-a-great-wine-business/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 17:19:14 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/find-out-how-french-rugby-star-gerard-bertrand-built-a-great-wine-business/ 6 The work ethic and determination that made Gérard Bertrand, 58, a former French rugby international, has also helped him build one of the largest and most influential wine companies in France. As a young man, he learned the basics of his father’s Villemajou estate in Boutenac, in the Corbières, Languedoc, before leaving for a […]]]>

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The work ethic and determination that made Gérard Bertrand, 58, a former French rugby international, has also helped him build one of the largest and most influential wine companies in France.

As a young man, he learned the basics of his father’s Villemajou estate in Boutenac, in the Corbières, Languedoc, before leaving for a bachelor’s degree in business administration and sport in Toulouse.

Winemaker Gérard Bertrand

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Winemaker Gérard BertrandCredit: AFP-Getty
In 2002 he began to revolutionize his growing portfolio of wineries

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In 2002 he began to revolutionize his growing portfolio of wineriesCredit: AFP-Getty

But in 1987, after the tragic accidental death of his father, Gérard returned to take up the family torch at the Domaine de Villemajou.

Totally immersed in the profession, in 1992 he created the Gérard Bertrand wine company in order to develop a range of wines from his beloved Languedoc and Roussillon in the south of France.

Bertrand was convinced very early on that viticulture, in harmony with nature, was the best way to reveal the qualities and typicality of a terroir and to produce great wines.

In 2002, he began to revolutionize his growing portfolio of vineyards by introducing the principle of biodynamics at his Cigalus estate.

Biodynamics is a holistic, ecological and ethical approach to agriculture, gardening, food and nutrition. Bertrand pioneered this natural approach in his vineyards to produce exceptional fruit that helps him craft amazing wines.

With 16 vineyards now under his ownership or control, Bertrand continues his quest to cultivate the best terroirs in Languedoc, then tell their story to the rest of the world.

Most read in The Irish Sun

Now O’Briens Wine, which exclusively distributes much of the extensive Bertrand range in Ireland, is hosting a virtual tasting with this iconic winemaker on March 24. An event you will miss at your own risk.

Bertrand will join O’Briens Wine Director, Master of Wine Lynne Coyle, to guide you through a special case of tasting from the South of France.

It includes a bottle of Gérard Bertrand Cote des Roses 2021 (rrp €18.95), Gérard Bertrand Orange Gold (rrp €21.95), Gérard Bertrand Domaine de Villemajou (rrp €20.95) and Gérard Bertrand Cigalus (rrp 39 €.95). Total value: €101.81.

But this special and highly anticipated virtual tasting will only cost you €80 – including a tasting sheet and free wine delivery. A total bargain.

Go online now to obrienswine.fr and reserve your place, there are limited places left. The Monday before the event, you will receive a zoom link to the tasting.

If you can’t make it at night, don’t worry, O’Briens Wine will send you a link to the video and you can watch and join as you please.

ROSSO DI MONTALCINO, MASTROIANNI (ABV 14 PER CENT)

€34.95 rrp @ independent vouchers

THE pinnacle of Sangiovese production.

This fully matured wine with a brilliant ruby ​​color has a wonderful richness, evidently aided by its aging for up to seven months in large French oak barrels and another three in bottle before release.

Rosso Di Montalcino, Mastroianni (ABV 14 percent)

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Rosso Di Montalcino, Mastroianni (ABV 14 percent)

It has juicy and sour cherry aromas.

The palate is intense, delivering masses of dark fruit flavors with hints of spice, structured tannins and a wonderfully savory finish.

Enjoy with: Pecorino cheese.

ALTA MORA ETNA BIANCO (ABV 12 PER CENT)

€23.95 @ Wine O’Briens

A TRUE Sicilian gem, made from the indigenous Carricante grape – grown in high altitude vineyards on the slopes of the Etna volcano.

The bouquet is memorable – with notes of lemongrass, melon, pear, peach and even a hint of herbs.

Alta Mora Etna Bianco (ABV 12 percent)

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Alta Mora Etna Bianco (ABV 12 percent)Credit: Unknown, clear with photo office

The full-bodied palate is well structured, unctuous, with nice mineral streaks and a full bowl of citrus, green apple and pear notes.

The finish is clean and crisp.

Enjoy with: Perfect with seafood dishes.

PAZO BAIÓN ALBARIÑO (ABV 13.5 PER CENT)

€26.95 @ Wine O’Briens

EXCEPTIONAL, single vineyard, limited edition Albarino from an estate that has been around for approximately 600 years.

This cuvée comes from manual harvesting of 45-year-old vines.

Pazo Baión Albariño (ABV 13.5 percent)

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Pazo Baión Albariño (ABV 13.5 percent)

It is a straw yellow color with greenish reflections in the glass.

Fermented with wild yeasts, it presents intense and floral aromas of orange blossom and jasmine.

The palate presents citrus and tropical notes with a nice hint of salinity and a lingering and aromatic finish.

Enjoy with: Seafood.

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Generation Next: The Acadian Wine Company arrives in West Grove https://perbaccocellars.com/generation-next-the-acadian-wine-company-arrives-in-west-grove/ Tue, 22 Feb 2022 20:35:19 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/generation-next-the-acadian-wine-company-arrives-in-west-grove/ Photo by Richard L. Gaw Pennsylvania winemaker Kyle Jones recently purchased the nearly eight-acre Kreutz Creek vineyards in West Grove, where he will own and operate The Acadian Wine Company. By Richard L. Gaw Personal editor When winemaker Kyle Jones first arrived at Kreutz Creek Vineyards in West Grove last November, he was there to […]]]>

Photo by Richard L. Gaw Pennsylvania winemaker Kyle Jones recently purchased the nearly eight-acre Kreutz Creek vineyards in West Grove, where he will own and operate The Acadian Wine Company.

By Richard L. Gaw

Personal editor

When winemaker Kyle Jones first arrived at Kreutz Creek Vineyards in West Grove last November, he was there to buy equipment from Jim and Carole Kirkpatrick, who were retiring after owning and operating the vineyard for the past 25 last years.

There, high on the hill, Jones saw the enveloping field of nearly eight acres of vineyards, tumbling gently to the east.

All this Jones had always wanted and needed as a winemaker was already there, firmly entrenched and permanent. Vines so thick and robust as heavy rope were meticulously aligned in neat rows. A small but efficient production unit stood in the center of the vineyard. The spacious, airy house the Kirkpatricks lived in had lovely views of the vineyard below and could easily be converted into a wine-tasting space for guests.

It was all there in front of Jones like a dream come true, and last December he became the new owner of the vineyard and proceeded to give it a new name: The Acadian Wine Company.

I have been making wine for several years, and while I don’t come from a family that has land we owned companies, so the potential of owning a winery as a business has always been there for me,” Jones said, which had been Chief Winemaker of Nissley Vineyards & Winery in Lancaster County until 2021. “Wmanufacturing is a creative outlet for me, but Starting from scratch in the wine industry seems like a daunting undertaking, but the potential of our growing regions and taking over a turnkey operation has made it more achievable.

Acadian origins

In his welcome letter to customers of Kreutz Creek Vineyards, Jones detailed what he inherited – four acres of 20-year-old growth of Vitis vinifera (common vine) and three acres of Vitis vinifera complex hybrid grape
vines, including some complex Bordeaux grape varieties. The coincidence was strange, he wrote, given his origins of the family in Europe.
“The winemaker in this case (Jones) is a descendant of the Acadians who brought some of these same types of vines with them across the Atlantic to North America in the early 1600s from the territory of France,” wrote Jones. “Learning to adapt and associate with the land and its inhabitants is the first tradition of the Acadian people.

“Similarly, the vines contained in these vineyards have flourished from twenty-five years of growth and adaptation in this site.”

Accoaccompanied by his dog Lilly and friends and family, Jones – who recently took over responsibility for the winemaking of the Paradocx Vineyard in Landenbergis currently preparing its vinesor the cultivation of Cabernet Franc, Chambourcin, Chardonnay, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Vidalas well as
transformation of several rooms at the intermediate level and the outer deck of the former Kirkpatrick House to what will become a tasting area.

“I want it to be a space where people can participate in a celebration of wine,” he said. “We want our guests to be welcomed here into our ‘home’, where they can enjoy the fruits of our labor on this magnificent property.

Jones enters another growing season knowing full well that the life of a winemaker is both a labor of love and an investmentboth in science and creativity – and it all depends on the intangible of the climate in which the grapes grow. like a pennywinemaker lvania, Jones is at a double
advantage; the commonwealth ranks as the fourth largest in the country wine producer, representing 1.5% of the total volume, behind California, Washington and New York. In addition, the rocky soil and the microclimate of the department make the region particularly well suited to the cultivation of many varieties of grapes.

Consequently, Chester County has has continued to emerge as a major player in the regional wine scene, highlighted by more than a dozen wineries and tasting rooms that attract visitors from across the Mid-Atlantic and beyond.

“Able to stand on the world stage”

“The wine region in the southeast corner of Pennsylvania is able to stand on the world stage”, Jones noted. “There is no excuse for producing bad wine. If I believe wine is a common experience and not just separate pillars on their own hills – there must be a cohesion of the winegrowers. We are not competitors, but collaborators.

While there’s no definitive book demonstrating how a winemaker can combine the business, creative and entertainment aspects of winery ownership, Jones said it often comes down to small details.

“I painted the top of the bar white because when I walk into a wine tasting room and take a glass of wine from a wooden bar, I can’t see the wine,” he said. -he declares. “That level of attention – and intention – is what underpins everything.”

When The Acadian Wine Company starts its first year this month of April, his first harvest will still be several mmonths, so Jones develops a wine list from other regions to serve customers in 2022 – including the wines he salutesmself made in Pennsylvania.

“I will welcome guandsts in my ‘house’ and offerwines that I did and stand behind wiwithout question,” he said. “I could put my wine on the table next to California grape varieties, Italy and France and shamelessly say, ‘It’s Pennsylvania wine, and it belongs here.’

“I may be the next generation of winemakers in this region, but I stand on the shoulders of giants. All the work they have done makes what I do possible. While I have experience as a winemaker in Pennsylvania, I hope to be insinuated within this communityity. The rising tide helps us all to rise, as long as we all raise our anchors.

The Acadian Wine Company is located at 553 S. Guernsey Road in West Grove. To keep up to date with the latest news from La Compagnie des Vins Acadiens, visit www.acadianwinecompany.comor email [email protected]

To contact editor Richard L. Gaw, e-mail [email protected].

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‘We’re going to keep fighting’: South Wedge wine company denied liquor license https://perbaccocellars.com/were-going-to-keep-fighting-south-wedge-wine-company-denied-liquor-license/ Mon, 21 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://perbaccocellars.com/were-going-to-keep-fighting-south-wedge-wine-company-denied-liquor-license/ ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – A new Rochester-area winery is looking to sell a niche product that is growing in popularity. However, after being denied their liquor license last week, the owners are now even further away from their grand opening. This niche product is natural wine. The new trend in the wine industry has gained […]]]>

ROCHESTER, NY (WROC) – A new Rochester-area winery is looking to sell a niche product that is growing in popularity. However, after being denied their liquor license last week, the owners are now even further away from their grand opening.

This niche product is natural wine. The new trend in the wine industry has gained popularity in major cities over the past few years and Rochester is now joining the club. Natural wine is similar to the wine you would buy at a liquor store but made sustainably with very little human intervention.

Brandon Opalich has worked in the wine industry for almost 20 years. He says natural wine has been sold in Rochester restaurants for a few years now but wants to make it more accessible.

“I think the most visible benefits are agricultural. Just take care of the earth and let people decide if they want to support these eco-friendly businesses. It should be their right to access it,” Opalich said.

Opalich owns Aldaskeller Wine Company on Gregory Street in the South Wedge area. He has been preparing the official opening of the store for 9 months. He curated the product, found retail space, and gained community support. However, upon obtaining his liquor license, the New York State Liquor Authority denied the application.

“We thought that because we were offering a different product with a different concept, a public convenience would be satisfied. We had local politicians, state politicians, local business owners, distributors I work with, all the right letters of support for this hearing. I felt they were being ignored,” Opalich said, “The state tells a business it’s not a viable business, and does it rudely and does it to intimidate people just isn’t a good way to treat New York State voters.

In a statement, the New York State Liquor Authority wrote in part: “Decisions regarding applications for the sale of liquor and wine are based on the legal standard of whether public convenience and benefit will be served by adding a additional store, including an assessment of whether the community is well served by existing stores. Although the Board has no concerns with the concept of this store, the application was unanimously disapproved due to the proximity of existing liquor stores to the applicant’s chosen location, including one located about 300 feet, which presented problems under that legal standard that applies to all new liquor store applications.

According to Opalich, his store poses no threat to the liquor store down the street, “Time for Wine and Spirits.”

“The SLA used, I believe, loopholes in this public convenience language to deny my license, but I understand distance really shouldn’t be an issue. It’s really a matter of demand,” Opalich said.

Now, Opalich will file an appeal seeking reconsideration to prove that the South Wedge neighborhood is a good candidate for a natural wine store.

“I hope all of the petition signatures, all of the letters of support will go a long way in proving to the New York State Liquor Authority that Rochester really wants a natural wine store, they are ready for the natural wine store,” a said Opalich.

Once the appeal is filed, Opalich will receive a formal denial letter and from there it relies on letters of support from the community to get the process going again.

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